Tuesday, April 16, 2019

French Goose Egg Omelette

Or, I suppose I should say, omelette oeuf d'oie. Which is, as you might imagine, French for goose egg omelette.

ANYWAY, I made one.

My friend Doris gave me some goose eggs because these geese wandered up a few years ago and made themselves at home and keep laying eggs and her family won't -- knowingly -- eat them. And Charlie and I will.

Okay, so much for the goose egg. What makes it French?

As I found out wasting time researching on YouTube, it's French if it's cooked slowly and rolled up instead of folded in half. Very tender and fluffish.

Yeah, so I started by frying some mushrooms in a dry pan. Meanwhile, I beat one goose egg with some sour cream, salt, and marjoram. When the mushrooms were done, I took them out and I added some vegan margarine to the pan, then the egg.

You pull that around a little until it starts to set, make sure the bottom of the pan is covered with the egg. I put some cheese and mushrooms on that and, when it was pretty much set, rolled it up and topped it with more cheese and mushrooms.

SO tender and creamy! VERY nice!

I'm posting at my own blog today about another kind of mushroom--wild morels!

MarianAllen, Author Lady
Fantasies, mysteries, comedies, recipes

3 comments:

Cerebrations.biz said...

Goose eggs...
Very interesting

bookworm said...

I wonder if the texture is anything like duck eggs. Years ago, when I lived in the countryside of Arkansas, my husband and I had both geese (no, we didn't eat their eggs) and Campbell ducks (bred for egg laying). I love duck eggs hard boiled or in baking and I still buy them sometimes from an Amish store about 30 miles from where I live. But, cooked as scrambled eggs or in an omelet, there was just something about the texture I couldn't stand. Perhaps we just weren't cooking them right. No You Tube when we owned ducks; no Internet yet. Alana ramblinwitham.blogspot.com

Marian Allen said...

We don't notice a difference in texture, scrambled or in an omelette. We haven't just plain-up fried one or boiled one. They're lovely for baking, though.